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[tdf-discuss] Re: NMake vs MinGW


Jonathan Aquilina wrote
Joel we are really complicating things with mingw when all one would need
to do is install visual studio and run nmake from its command line and you
are good to go.

Because MinGW is an Open Source compiler and Visual Studio is a closed
source, commercial compiler which has a free limited version. Using Visual
Studio is a courtesy (which could stop at any time). Using an Open Source
tool to build an Open Source program makes ALL sense.

(unfortunately Jan Holesovsky aka Kendy from Suse, who set up and maintains
the  MinGW tinderbox seems to have his hands full with other stuff)

See these old topics about MinGW
http://nabble.documentfoundation.org/Compiling-in-Windows-td1792684.html

and

http://nabble.documentfoundation.org/MinGW-master-build-td3400162.html



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