Date: prev next · Thread: first prev next last
2011 Archives by date, by thread · List index

OpenDocument accurate representation file format? Re: [tdf-discuss] New "LibreOffice Reader" Eliminates Need for "PDF Reader"


Anyway, I don´t consider PDF a proper "OPEN" standard, as it´s not
designed by a global consortium like OASIS.

What about designing a new file format for this purpose and being part
of OpenDocument? Some people said DjVu being accurate but lacking some
features (vectorial image support?).

I'm not a developer at all, but I think OpenDocument format family
should evolve in this direction some day. PDF-based ISO standard
follows a lying way similar to Mono and .NET: the open standard lags
behind the official implementation. This is a very dangerous trap that
is still giving too much advantages to Adobe over competitors.


On Sun, Jun 26, 2011 at 1:07 PM, Ian Lynch <ianrlynch@gmail.com> wrote:
On 26 June 2011 01:15, Sean White <runicpaladin@gmail.com> wrote:

I dont thinks thats normal somehow, i have been using Adobe Reader for
years
and have NEVER had it come past 200MB.


ISTR a whole load of adverising crap in one large Acrobat download.

Back to discussion, what's with all the PDF hate.


Not hate, irritation by misuse.  Hundreds of files to download that could
simply be in HTML pages (as Alexandro indicated). We get stuff originated in
whatever app and distributed in pdf format when it will never ever get
printed. In fact mostly you can produce a pdf from a web page if you really
need to anyway. I have 100 page application forms from the EU in Acrobat
that need huge hardware resources just to be usable. This stuff should be in
client server databases operated through web browsers not desktop pdf files.
I accept all this as transition noise as we move to mobile technologies and
the web. pdf was not originally designed for these purposes, it was designed
for systems putting the information on to paper and has been extended and
bloated accordingly. Arguably, rather like Office applications ;-).

 It serves a very good
purpose a standard, editable document that shows up exactly how you want it
WHEREVER you are and whatever OS you are using.


Not disputing that. If you want distribute a document accurately for
printing on paper, use pdf.


this has always been its
use and so it falls in a different document category to ODF.  ODF is an
office format created to compete with MSO's doc, xls an ppt formats.  to
essentially modify the underlying purpose to make it behave more like a PDF
would waste most of what we have put into it.


I agree, so let's look at the future and that is the web and mobile
tecnologies. How do we get LibO to the web? That would be a far better
priority for the use of resources.

--
Ian

Ofqual Accredited IT Qualifications (The Schools ITQ)

www.theINGOTs.org +44 (0)1827 305940

The Learning Machine Limited, Reg Office, 36 Ashby Road, Tamworth,
Staffordshire, B79 8AQ. Reg No: 05560797, Registered in England and
Wales.

--
Unsubscribe instructions: E-mail to discuss+help@documentfoundation.org
Posting guidelines + more: http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Netiquette
List archive: http://listarchives.documentfoundation.org/www/discuss/
All messages sent to this list will be publicly archived and cannot be deleted



-- 
Unsubscribe instructions: E-mail to discuss+help@documentfoundation.org
Posting guidelines + more: http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Netiquette
List archive: http://listarchives.documentfoundation.org/www/discuss/
All messages sent to this list will be publicly archived and cannot be deleted

Context


Privacy Policy | Impressum (Legal Info) | Copyright information: Unless otherwise specified, all text and images on this website are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. This does not include the source code of LibreOffice, which is licensed under the Mozilla Public License (MPLv2). "LibreOffice" and "The Document Foundation" are registered trademarks of their corresponding registered owners or are in actual use as trademarks in one or more countries. Their respective logos and icons are also subject to international copyright laws. Use thereof is explained in our trademark policy.